FACT: There would be no AMERICAN History without Black History

I’m going to go ahead and say it. Just like our culture is appropriated, our contributions are fancied when it is convenient. Made only to be highlighted in February, however, we’re utilized at every opportunity. Just in case you need a reminder, WE built this country. From the literal architecture of buildings, schools, churches and universities. From medical advancements, to include the Plasma transfusion, and the first successful heart surgery–WE built this country. From the wars that we fought where we served on the front lines for 6 months resulting in 171 of the  Tuskegee Airmen and Harlem Hell fighters receiving the Legion of Merit. (Patterson, 2017) — WE built this country. [caption id="attachment_5188" align="alignright" width="355"] The Tuskegee Airmen[/caption] From the technology that created the first color PC by Mark E. Dean to the leading ventures of the fax machine, touch tone telephone and the caller id, (Mentalfloss, 2018) — WE built this country. We could go on and on about what we have done, and also what we were made to do for this country. A country that has in most public school systems limited us to a couple of pages in their history books. The shortest month in a calendar year. A couple of cultural slides at work. And some of us actually wait until this time of the year to toss around a Black fact here and there. This country has tried to train us into believing that we and our contributions were/are back seat mentions. It has tried to convince us that the first successful heart surgery wasn’t a big deal and that the war efforts of the brave Tuskegee Airmen could have been done by someone else. America has chosen to highlight our achievements into a box, to only be seen when convenient. America has also caused many of us to only talk about our history in predetermined time slots. And what’s even worse is that we seem content abiding by this regulatory misguided rule. Our history needs to be an intricate part of this country. We need to stop waiting on our invitation for a seat at the table and remember that we made the table.  ]]>

6 comments
  1. Shadé
    Shadé
    February 7, 2018 at 10:16 am

    All facts. Well said. What would be your next steps of action? I’ve been having conversations about this with friends and we talk about what would be the next steps past awareness. And as a collective we aren’t sure about what comes next when we as a people are so divided.

    Reply
    • Tempestt Davis
      Tempestt Davis • Post Author •
      February 7, 2018 at 10:19 am

      I would invest in history textbooks that included all of our contributions. Since education is key and in this case ideal in spreading and making people re learn the real American history.
      Another item would be to stop participating in black history month. When we do that it sends the signal
      That our contributions are limited to this month because it’s different than the rest of history. Just my thoughts

      Reply
      • Shadé
        Shadé
        February 7, 2018 at 10:31 am

        Wow. Powerful message. It seems like there would need to be a campaign for that. We should talk.

        My whole world opened up when I focused on African and African American studies in my masters program. Let me say that again. I didn’t learn about intrigal parts of our history until POST undergrad. Ridic. But also a fault of our communities. Elders should be teaching these things and imparting the history to our youth. If we/they don’t do it, who else will?

        Reply
        • Tempestt Davis
          Tempestt Davis • Post Author •
          February 7, 2018 at 10:59 am

          Very true. It’s crazy at 33 I’m still learning brand new stuff about my own history. I make my kids watch and read about their history a couple times a week.
          I don’t want them walking around without the knowledge that so many of us are still trying to get.

          Reply
  2. Antron Evans
    Antron Evans
    February 7, 2018 at 10:51 am

    Your article was well written and presented a great insight into our own limitations. As a successful Black Man, I find myself trying to convince our people not to accept a struggle but to appreciate hard work. Our history was systemically taken from us by White Europeans and Africans. We were beaten and raped to instill fear and low confidence. Our ancestors was the slaves that came to this country and fought to build the “table” you mentioned. However, we have forgot how to fight and grow from what they did over 200 years ago.

    Reply
    • Tempestt Davis
      Tempestt Davis • Post Author •
      February 7, 2018 at 10:58 am

      Thank you and yes. We do have to start looking forward. We have to do the worksnd not be distracted on what they want us to do.

      Reply
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