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Home Daily Dose of History DAILY DOSE OF HISTORY: Horace Pippin - Painter

DAILY DOSE OF HISTORY: Horace Pippin – Painter

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Horace Pippin, Black art, Black Arts Movement, Black artist, Black artists, Black painter, Black History, Black History 365, DDH: Daily Dose of History

West Chester

Horace Pippin was born on February 22, 1888, in West Chester, Pennsylvania. When he was still a young child, the Pippin family moved to Goshen, New York. Pippin quickly developed a love for art. Despite having limited access to art supplies, he made a name for himself throughout the neighborhood as a promising artist.

Harlem’s Hell Fighters

In his teen years, Pippin dropped out of school in order to earn an income after his mother fell ill. He worked at a hotel for years while also working other odd jobs that he could find. Like many Black men in the early to mid-1900s, Pippin decided to join the army. He fought overseas in World War I (WWI) as part of the 369th Infantry, or Harlem’s Hell Fighters.

‘Losing the Way’

While fighting in WWI, Pippin was shot in his right arm, losing all mobility in it. He then returned to the U.S. in 1919, living in West Chester where he married a woman named Jennie Wade. He propped his right arm up with a poker that he used to make art. He returned to drawing, using his left hand to guide his right hand. His first post-war piece was titled, ‘Losing the Way’ (1930).
Horace Pippin, Black art, Black Arts Movement, Black artist, Black artists, Black painter, Black History, Black History 365, DDH: Daily Dose of History

Career

Pippin’s work was soon featured in a home county show. In 1938, his work then became part of a traveling art exhibit with the Museum of Modern Art. Pippin’s art depicted various forms of Black life. Paintings such as ‘Domino Players’ (1943) and ‘Harmonizing’ (1944) epitomize the muse behind his artwork. He also became famous for his many self-portraits.
Pippin was also praised for his artistic renditions of historical figures, like abolitionist John Brown and former president Abraham Lincoln. He and his work went on to be featured in publications, such as Newsweek and Vogue.

Legacy

Horace Pippin suffered a stroke and died on July 6, 1946, in his hometown of West Chester. He was 48 years old. His work was posthumously displayed in various museums and much of his written work was digitized and placed in the Archives of American Art by the Smithsonian Institute. Pippin was a brilliant, self-taught painter who influences artists to this day.
Horace Pippin, Black art, Black Arts Movement, Black artist, Black artists, Black painter, Black History, Black History 365, DDH: Daily Dose of History
**The views and actions of the DDH historical figures that are featured may not reflect the views and beliefs of Ramiro The Writer or We Buy Black. Thank you.**
Thank you all for reading my article. I’m a part of the largest online marketplace for Black-owned businesses called We Buy Black. Similar to Etsy or Amazon, this website allows for Black-owned businesses to create a shop and sell their amazing products to the world! If you have a product, you should definitely join this platform! We Buy Black also has it’s Inaugural We Buy Black Convention happening this November 16th-17th in Atlanta, GA and I hope to see you all there. In fact, I along with hundreds of others will be wearing our official We Buy Black T-shirt, so here’s my gift to you: Get 50% off the official WBB T-shirt using my code WBB2018. Peace, family!
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