No Feminism Or Gender Equality For Black Women, We All We Got!

In the Fight for Gender Equality, Black Women Stand Alone Being a Black woman in America is starting to feel like a continuous attack. We are hyper sexualized, ridiculed, and judged. Black women are expected to carry society on our backs. We are the Mothers who must remain strong throughout adversity. All while silently accepting our places on the proverbial caste system. It is an uphill battle fighting for equality based on skin tone and chromosome. Black women show up and show out. We uplift Black men and help make them the true kings they are. Whether it’s as their mothers, sisters, or lovers. We are the dream catchers and taste makers. Black queens build empires—these days, damn near single-handedly. Yet sadly, despite the magic we are praised to possess, we manage to be objectified.

Male Privilege Isn’t the Only Problem

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="700"] ‘Girls’ producer Murray Miller and actress Aurora Perrineau[/caption] These days, many women despite ethnicity, have been mistreated by men of power. They have found the courage to stand up for themselves. Have you noticed though, the way the stories of Black women are disregarded? Last week, Black actress Aurora Perrineau (daughter of Harold Perrineau) went to police to file a report against “Girls” executive producer Murray Miller. He allegedly raped her in 2012. Perrineau should have been heard. She should have been given the benefit of the doubt, like so many others before her. Instead, self-proclaimed white feminist Lena Dunham immediately sided with her friend Miller and in so many (ill-chosen) words, called Perrineau a liar. Dunham has since apologized, but the damage is already done. It’s apparent feminism and women’s rights are ideals not to be embraced and enjoyed by women of color. When it comes to true equality, the fight endures. When Lupita Nyong’o accused Harvey Weinstein of sexual assault in October, he publicly denied the allegations. Nyong’o was one of many women who chose courageousness, yet she was the only victim whose pain dignified a direct denial. The levels of frustration and exhaustion are almost indescribable. It is important that as Black women we realize as a community, we sometimes stand alone. Fortunately, we do have the support of Black men. We also have a stronger sense of self than ever before. It may not be as much as others take for granted daily, but it’s a start. We’ve made something out of nothing before; and we’ll do it again. How wonderful it is that we’re good at it.]]>

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