- Advertisement -
Home Uncategorized We Don't Want 'Inclusion' Or Integration, We Want Power

We Don’t Want ‘Inclusion’ Or Integration, We Want Power

- Advertisement -

Photo: AFP via Getty Images

Jim Clark was the sheriff of Dallas County, Alabama when civil rights protestors came in search of voting rights. Clark was a racist, pure and simple. Reflecting back on his encounters with Jim Clark, Kwame Ture (Stokely Carmichael) said, “When we went to Mississippi we did not go to sit next to Ross Barnett; we did not go to sit next to Jim Clark; we went to get them out of our way.” The goal of protest isn’t to be included in anything that others still maintain control of. 50 years after the Housing Act of 1968, it was clear that “diversity and inclusion” didn’t do much to advance the masses of Black people.

50 years after the Civil Rights Act, Black unemployment was higher than when it was passed. Since the Federal Housing Act of ’68 was passed, Black homeownership has not increased and the wealth gap with whites has more than tripled. In many ways, Black people have lost ground in the age of civil rights and the reasons are clear: integration opened up opportunities (for middle-class Blacks, in particular) but also duped the masses into thinking they could live freely, without ownership. Ownership is power and without it, diversity and inclusion will only lead Black people down a path where protests are still necessary in 2070.

In this moment, in the aftermath of national protests, a host of initiatives have been launched. The question, however, is how many lead to true ownership? Government programs that provide basic needs for Black people are helpful but do not achieve that goal. Corporations can be helpful in this moment but their activities must be judged on whether or not they actually help increase Black ownership. Indeed, even Black organizations must be challenged in this moment. Many Black organizations are taking advantage of “white guilt” and raising funds. What they do with them, however, is crucial. If Black organizations are raising money to pad their budgets or simply to do seminars, the millions raised will not lead to increased ownership of anything.

Are Black people increasing their ownership or levels of independence in this moment? Black people must think critically about this question or this moment will be wasted. More “diversity and inclusion” is being offered by corporations and other entities but that isn’t the need. The history tells us that Black people will not be made better off without ownership. As legislators and corporations dangle more “solutions,” they must be evaluated by the simple metric of whether Black people will (independently) own more.

- Advertisement -
D'Juan Hopewell
I care about Black Power. Period. Currently working on creating jobs and funding new startups on the South Side of Chicago and writing here and there at HopewellThought.com. Follow me @HopewellThought.
- Advertisement -

Stay Connected

341,269FansLike
732,979FollowersFollow
220,589FollowersFollow
2,458FollowersFollow
2,988SubscribersSubscribe

Must Read

6 Black Owned CBD Brands to Help You Relax and Renew

The legal cannabis industry is booming and Black entrepreneurs are getting in on the action. Last year, the industry as a whole...
- Advertisement -

Ivyees Sells Natural Products Powered By Honey

For most of us, personal care products like toothpaste, hair products, and skin care just need to have a great smell or...

This Black Owned Company Makes “The Most Refreshing Drink On Earth”

Collective wisdom says that when you’re making a drink from a powder or liquid mix, you’re probably going to need to “hook...

Black Owned Xclusive Beauty Hair Store Has the Products You Need

Every entrepreneur has an origin story and for Xclusive Beauty Hair Store owner Talona Ogden, hers is one that many Black people...

Related News

6 Black Owned CBD Brands to Help You Relax and Renew

The legal cannabis industry is booming and Black entrepreneurs are getting in on the action. Last year, the industry as a whole...

Ivyees Sells Natural Products Powered By Honey

For most of us, personal care products like toothpaste, hair products, and skin care just need to have a great smell or...

This Black Owned Company Makes “The Most Refreshing Drink On Earth”

Collective wisdom says that when you’re making a drink from a powder or liquid mix, you’re probably going to need to “hook...

Black Owned Xclusive Beauty Hair Store Has the Products You Need

Every entrepreneur has an origin story and for Xclusive Beauty Hair Store owner Talona Ogden, hers is one that many Black people...

Accessorize With Black Owned Handbags and Jewelry

Handbags and jewelry are usually items that carry great meaning for us. Earrings from your granny, a handbag from your man, or...
- Advertisement -

4 COMMENTS

  1. Dear Mr Hopewell,
    I may have more choices than you as a white woman – I could help your movement because I have always wanted peace and justice. I’ve never been a victim. Period. Though I have suffered. While I am and always have been deeply concerned, hurt and sickened by racism and it’s ugly despicable manifestations I twinge a bit to hear you say ‘white guilt’ . How do I become more anti -racist? I don’t however feel guilty.
    It reminds me of a story I heard about three rabbis visiting the holocaust museum in Skokie, apparently there is door to exit if you think you have no prejudice.
    They all thought they could go through, but none of them could. Why not ?Because it was locked, our humanness, reality of all having some bias and prejudice. Perhaps ponder that a bit. Creating divisiveness can go two ways.

    • “How do I become more anti -racist?”

      Hi Mary,

      To answer your question, if you truly want to be anti-racist, you can be more anti-racist by depositing all, or some, of your income into one of many Black-owned financial institutions, such as One United Bank. And when you open a checking/savings account, you can show even more anti-racism by using my Advocate Profile ETEKAM, which rewards members for referring new accounts. Go to http://www.oneunited.com to begin.

      Need another way to be anti-racist? Here you go: replace your Tide washing detergent, with True Detergent, which is a Black-owned brand. Since you are already here, you can shop here on webuyblack.com, or even better, to show you are really about anti-racism, again, use my affiliate code https://bit.ly/3fGEfR6 which rewards users for referring new/returning customers. The interesting thing? You can earn money by referring all your friends to use this product, as well!

      These are just 2 examples. I could continue. You see, by participating in this economy, you directly improve the ownership and control of the resources, which are owned and controlled by Black businesses — unless you refuse to buy these products, for whatever reason, well then you would just be plain ol’ practitioner of, well, good old fashioned racism.

      You see, just saying you are antiracist means nothing. To say, you want inclusion and diversity doesn’t help. Racism is about ownership, economics, and control. If you didn’t know that, don’t be surprised, many people are confusing the issue of racism, with civil rights, inclusions, bigotry, hatred, etc. etc. They’re wrong. It’s all about the economics.

      Thank you

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here